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Cult – Vick Behm 02 #cultcrewracing

After that first Wetlands run go ahead and skip through the park nonsense to 01:01. That’s where you’ll find the part where Vick rips around Sheep Hills at full throttle! Spotted on Cult

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Cult Race Frames Available Now!

Ok, so it’s definitely not a trails frame, but if you’ve been around long enough you’ll remember the days when race frames were pretty much what everyone rode at the trails. That was unless you wanted to ride some heavy ass fuck freestyle frame with a 19″ top tube. I can definitely see Cult’s new Race frame ticking the boxes for some of you out there, especially if you like to also dabble at the track. Light, long, v-brakes; it’s just a no frills chromoly frame that can easily pull double duty at the track or trails. You can pick one up now for $349.99 from Cult’s Web Store. Pics, specs and Vic Behm putting it through its paces below!

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Cult – Vick Behm 01 #cultcrewracing

I’ve been stoked on Vick’s no fucks given, ride everything approach to racing for some time now! It reminds me of how myself and my friends looked at riding/racing back in the day, he’s just WAY faster than we ever were. With Cult’s Robbie Morales and Neal Wood getting back in touch with their racing roots by coming out with a race frame, I can’t think of a better person for them to have on board representing the brand!

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Sneak Peek: Cult Race Frame

I’m stoked that the dudes at Cult still take the time to develop products that give a nod to their racing and trails roots. First with the TRF trails/race frame that they came out with a couple of years ago, and now with a full on chromoly race frame. Look for Vic Behm to be burning up the track on this prototype real soon and for production versions to be available sometime this fall. I can definitely see some of these showing up in the woods! Preliminary specs after the jump.

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Buyers Guides Uncategorized

2016 Trails Frame Buyers Guide

We as trail riders have a slight tendency to ride frames and parts a lot longer than we really should. It’s nothing for someone to show up in the woods still rocking a frame with an American bottom bracket and press fit headset, (Shawn Shoener, I’m looking in your direction). The thing about it is that both frames and parts really should be replaced every a few years. No one wants to find themselves in a twisted ball of metal and flesh because something catastrophically failed due to fatigue. Take a second to think about the forces and stress that riding trails puts frames and parts under. Also take a second to think about the ramifications of say your head tube blowing off while going full speed through a section. I’ve seen it happen before, and it’s not pretty. At the very least you should be diligent in checking your bike over for cracks and other tell tale signs of fatigue. If you do feel it’s time to replace that relic of a frame you’ve been trusting your life to with something new, we’ve assembled a list of seventeen frames that we’d consider worthy of doing the job.

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Blog

Sneak Peek: Cult Sect Forks with 32mm Offset

Being the over-analytical product nerd that I am, one of the first things that came to mind when Cult debuted their TRF frame was that they didn’t have a fork to go with it. Sure they make forks, but they all have steeper offsets that make them more of a compliment to street frames than they would be to a trails frame with its slacker head tube. Apparently they were were thinking the same thing, as this picture of a sample of one of their Sect forks with a 32mm offset popped up on product designer Neal Wood’s Instagram. While these particular ones were sent off to Chase Hawk for testing, it wouldn’t surprise me in the least to see a production version join Cult’s line sometime in the near future.

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Blog Up Close

Up Close: Cult TRF Frame

“A Cult trails frame eh?” That’s what I thought to myself when the first CAD drawing of what would eventually be dubbed the Cult TRF (Trail/Race Frame) showed up on Instagram. While a trails frame is a pretty radical departure from the direction Cult has been on since its inception, it does make sense if you stop to consider who the two main driving forces behind the brand are, Robbie Morales and product designer Neal Wood. Both of their roots lie deep in the 90’s trails and racing scenes, so there was never a doubt in my mind as to whether or not a man once know as the “Trail Boss” and another man who led the “clips are for kooks” movement on the track could come up with a well thought out and designed trails frame. How well the present day trails scene would receive a trails frame from a company who’s product line up until this point has primarily been targeted towards street riders is the only real question that I had.

To be perfectly honest with you, opinions were mixed. While Robbie’s former position of the “Trail Boss” still held weight with some, other’s felt that he had long since abandoned the scene that once held him in such high regards. Having been friends with Robbie for 15+ years, I fall into that first category, and I was actually pretty interested to see just what he and Neal would cook up. I mean he was instrumental in the creation of two of my favorite frames of all time, the Standard Trail Boss and the Terrible One Progression!

The TRF is exactly what you would expect a modern day trails frame to be. The geometry is pretty standard with a 74.5° head tube, 71° seat tube, 11.65″ bottom bracket height, 13.85″ rear end length and 8.75″ standover. The slimmed down 100% Cult Classic tubing, tapered seatstays and tiny dropouts give the frame a svelte look, while the gussets on both the top and down tubes reassure you that it’s not going to blow apart if you come up short on something. Cult also made sure that the rear end has plenty of room to accommodate tires up to 2.4″ wide. Two things that immediately caught my eye when I first pulled the frame out of the box were the welds and the frame’s finishing details. The ED black coating Cult used on the TRF doesn’t hide anything, and you can see that the welds are consistent with even beads around every tube junction. The subtle Cult logos embossed on the top tube gusset, integrated seat clamp and the seatstay bridge, and the nicely machined bottom bracket and head tube give the frame a very finished and polished look. While Cult is pretty infamous for their wild graphics, they kept things toned down with the clean gray and white ones they chose for the TRF.

One thing that I know is going to be a sticking point for some people out there is the removable seatstay brake mounts and cable stop. I’ve only owned one frame with removable mounts, and though I never had any issues with them, I still prefer the mounts and cable stop to be welded on. I also prefer the mounts to be on the chainstays, but all of that is just a matter of personal preference.

I think Cult’s first foray into producing a trails frame is a damn good one! It ticks the boxes both geometry-wise and looks-wise, and it comes from the minds of two guys who left lasting impressions on both the trails and race scenes. Now if we can only get them back out into the woods aboard their own personal TRFs!

Cult’s TRF frame is available now from your favorite shop or mail order and will set you back right around $330.

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Specs

Top Tube Lengths: – 20″, 20.5″, 20.75″, 21″, 21.25″
Chainstay Length: – 13.85″
Head Tube Angle: – 74.5°
Seat Tube Angle: – 71°
Standover Height: – 8.75″
BB Height: – 11.65″
BB Type: – Mid
Dropouts: – 14mm
Brake Mounts: – Removable on Seatstays
Weight: – 5lbs 2oz (21″tt on my scale)
Colors: – ED Black
Country of Origin: – Taiwan
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TRF Frame Promo featuring Steven Mack

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Blog

Cult TRF Frame Promo

Cult’s new TRF trails/race frame has been a hot button topic in the woods lately. It’s actually been pretty polarizing! Love it or hate it, Cult stepped up and made a damn solid frame with geometry that complements roasting some jumps. Here we get our first look at a TRF in action in this promo featuring Steven Mack doing his thing at the Stay Strong Compound. Check it!

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Blog

Steven Mack’s Cult TRF

The physical manifestation of the new trail frame Cult has been working on made its first appearance at Interbike last month. Looks like Steven Mack gets the honor of being the first to put the Cult TRF prototype through its paces. Thinking about who they have on their team, I can’t think of a better person (who doesn’t already have a signature frame) to do it.

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Uncategorized

Cult TRF Trail Frame

It’s been over a year since Neal Wood (Cult’s product designer) posted up a CAD drawing of what I speculated to be a potential Cult trail frame. I hadn’t heard anything else about it since then and honestly thought that the project was dead. That was until yesterday when Neal posted the whole CAD drawing along with specs and a release date. So yeah, it looks like the original “Trailboss” is getting back to his roots and bringing out a Cult trail frame next month dubbed the Cult TRF. Peep the specs after the jump!